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Heretics, Schismatics, or Catholics? Latin Attitudes to the Greeks in the Long Twelfth Century +
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Heretics, Schismatics, or Catholics? Latin Attitudes to the Greeks in the Long Twelfth Century

Studies and Texts

Forthcoming

Studies and Texts 216 • 2019 • approx. 310 pp. • ISBN 978-0-88844-216-1 • Cloth • $95

The political division of the Roman world into Western and Eastern Roman Empires at the end of the fourth century spurred the divergence of the Latinised Western and the Hellenised Eastern halves. According to a pervasive and deeply ingrained belief in modern academic, educational and popular literature, the ensuing antagonism on religious and cultural grounds between the two parts of medieval Christendom eventually led to the “schism of 1054.” Less than fifty years after the schism, Greeks and Latins came into closer contact as a result of the crusades and the encounter was catastrophic, leading to the capture and sack of Constantinople in 1204 by the armies of the Fourth Crusade. This study, the first to deal exclusively with Latin perceptions of and attitudes toward the Greeks in terms of religion, aims to revisit and challenge the view that the so-called schism between the Latin and Greek Churches led to the isolation of the Byzantine Empire by the Latin states and eventually to the events of 1204.

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