Mellon Fellows and Visitors: Archive

Mellon Fellows

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Christopher Bonura

Dr. Christopher Bonura earned his PhD in History in 2019 at the University of California, Berkeley, with a dissertation entitled “The Roman Empire of the Apocalypse: History, Eschatology, and the Four Kingdoms of Daniel in Late Antiquity, the Early Middle East, and Byzantium.” He has been a lecturer in the History Department, UC Berkeley since the summer of 2020. In addition to three forthcoming articles, Dr. Bonura’s most recent publication is “When did the Legend of the Last Emperor Originate? A New Look at the Textual Relationship between the Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius and the Tiburtine Sibyl,” Viator, vol 47, no. 3 (Autumn, 2016): 47-100. While a Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow, Dr. Bonura will begin work on a monograph drawn from his dissertation, dealing with the Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius.

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Michael S. Hahn

Dr. Michael S. Hahn received his PhD, Divinity, at the University of St. Andrews in January 2020 for his dissertation entitled “Poor Brides of Christ: Distinctive Forms of Franciscan Mysticism in Bonaventure and Angela of Foligno.” He published “Pourquoi les reliques de Saint André de Fife n’attirèrent jamais autant de pélerins que celles de Saint Jacques à Compostelle?” Compostelle: Cahiers du Centre d’Étude de Recherches et d’Histoire Compostellanes 19 (2016): 10-28, with two more forthcoming. His research project at the Institute as a Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow focuses on John-Jerome of Prague’s reception of Angela of Foligno’s Liber, emphasizing the influence of thirteenth-century female theologians.

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Krisztina Ilko

Dr. Krisztina Ilko received her PhD in History of Art in 2020 at Pembroke College, University of Cambridge, writing a dissertation entitled “The Artistic Patronage of the Augustinian Friars in Central Italy (1256 – c. 1370). She is currently departmental lecturer in the Department of the History of Art, University of Cambridge, Director of Studies in Medieval Art at Homerton College, Cambridge and Praeceptor, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. She has published fourteen articles, with another forthcoming in Gesta (2021), “Forging the Augustinian Past: The Rule-Giving of St Augustine in a Duocento Gradual.” Her project as a Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow this year is “The Sons of Augustine: Art and Memory in the Augustinian Churches of Central Italy.”

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Molly Lester

Dr. Molly Lester received her PhD in History from Princeton University in 2017, where she defended her dissertation entitled “The Word as Lived: The Practice of Orthodoxy in Early Medieval Iberia, c. 500-711.” She has been Assistant Professor of History at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis MD since the fall of 2017. Her most recent publication is “The Ties that Bind: Diagnosing Social Crisis in Julian of Toledo’s Historia Wambae,” Historiography and Identity II: Post-Roman Multiplicity and New Political Identities, ed. G. Heydemann, H. Reimitz, 269-296, Turnhout: Brepols, 2020. As a Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow, she will complete the final draft of her book, The Word as Lived: The Practice of Orthodoxy in Early Medieval Iberia.

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Research Associates

Carl Bear

Dr. Carl Bear earned his PhD in 2017 at the Graduate Theological Union with a dissertation entitled “Christian Funeral Practices in Late Fourth-Century Antioch.” Among his publications are “Why Luther Changed His Mind about Music: Martin Luther’s Theology of Music in Light of His Liturgical Reforms,” in Luther im Kontext: Reformbestrebungen und Musik in der ersten Hälfte des 16. Jahrhunderts, edited by Michael Klaper (Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag, 2016), 15–38, and with Sarah Kathleen Johnson, “Medieval Hymns on Modern Lips: An Analysis of Medieval Texts and Tunes in Twenty-First-Century Protestant Hymnals,” The Hymn 69.1 (2018): 10–16. Dr. Bear is currently Director of Music Ministry at St. Giles Kingsway Presbyterian Church, Toronto. During his association with the Institute, Dr. Bear plans to explore the role of the congregation in early liturgical music, focusing on sixth and seventh century Gaul. His project will contribute to understanding the “silencing of the laity” in liturgical music that scholars have observed emerging in the early middle ages.

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Shannon L. Wearing

Dr. Shannon Tiku Wearing (LMS candidate) earned her PhD in 2015 at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, with a dissertation entitled “Power and Style: The Liber Feudorum Maior and the Court of Alfonso II, King of Aragon and Count of Barcelona (r. 1162–1196).” She is the author of “Holy Donors, Mighty Queens: Imaging Women in the Spanish Cathedral Cartularies of the Long Twelfth Century (Journal of Medieval History, 2016), co-editor of Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts (De Gruyter, 2021), and is presently preparing a book, Image, Stone, and Song: Shaping Royal Identity in Medieval Barcelona (1150–1213). As a PIMS Visiting Fellow she will be conducting a research project on decorated charters in twelfth-century Iberia. 

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Visiting Scholars

Jonathan Boulton

Jonathan Boulton is Professor Emeritus of History and Medieval Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of two books, co-editor of one book with an additional five books in preparation. Sixty-five articles and chapters in books bear his name. He is the Founding Editor of Alta Studia Heraldica: The Scholarly Journal of the Royal Heraldry Society of Canada – La revue savante de la Société royale héraldique du Canada. During his Visiting Fellowship at the Institute, Professor Boulton will work to complete his book, “The Modern Myth of Medieval 'Chivalry': A Comprehensive Study of Didactic Works Proposing Codes of Behaviour for Noblemen composed 1170-1505,” which will refute the modern notions both of the existence of a single nobiliary code, and of the general association of such ideal behaviour with knighthood.

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Antonio Ricci

Dr. Antonio Ricci is Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities at York University. His research interests focus on the history of the book with particular attention to reading in the medieval and early modern periods and print culture in Renaissance Italy. He is editing The Orlando Furioso from Print to Digital: Five Centuries of Reading Ariosto. As a Visiting Scholar with the status of Visiting Fellow of the Institute, Dr. Ricci will be working on “Representations of Reading in Medieval and Renaissance Italy,” which deals with visual and textual depictions of readers in the 14th and 15th centuries.

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